We comply with all state and local Covid-19 mandates. Masks covering nose and mouth and maintaining a 6-foot social distance are required while visiting our store. Thank you for your cooperation.
We comply with all state and local Covid-19 mandates. Masks covering nose and mouth and maintaining a 6-foot social distance are required while visiting our store. Thank you for your cooperation.
0
Side view, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston
Another side view, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston
Front view, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston
Close-up shot of engraved initials on the front of the pitcher, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston
Bottom view, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston
Close-up shot of the markings on the bottom of the pitcher, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston
Interior, Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA - The Silver Vault of Charleston

Pulchritudinous Coin Silver Water Pitcher, Peter L. Krider, Philadelphia, PA

Regular price $3,060.00 $0.00 Unit price per
Shipping calculated at checkout.

11 3/8” height, 5 1/4” length, 7” width. 23.36 troy ounces.

 

Peter Krider, born in Philadelphia in 1821, began his life working on a farm. When he was 14, his life changed course when he became an apprentice to a local silversmith named John Curry, after which point he became a journeyman at the factory of R. W. Wilson. Krider later established his own business as a silversmith in 1851. 

At its height, Peter L. Krider Co. employed about 35 skilled workers and produced a massive amount of silver flatware, silverware, and hollowware; a number of flatware patterns were even patented by Krider. He was also a distinguished manufacturer of society and exposition medals — at one time, Peter L. Krider Co. was the largest medal plant in the country. He made medals for the National Academy of Design in NY, Massachusetts Humane Society, the World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, and many more. He came to be known in the silversmithing trade as “Honest Peter” for his decency as a businessman. 


Resources: 

Rainwater, Dorothy T., and Redfield, Judy. Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers. 

Revised 4th ed. Schiffer Publishing Ltd. 1998.

Venable, Charles. L. Silver in America: 1840-1940: A Century of Splendor. Dallas Museum of 

Art, Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 1994.

 ASK A QUESTION


Share this Product